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Analog in a Digital World

By Stacy Ellen 
Posted October 10, 2017

Any form of media in today's digital world relies on the latest in technology. Does digital take away from the soul of this consumption? 

Take for example, listening to music on a record versus your iPhone. For me even if it is a contemporary album like Bruno Mars, I feel nostalgic by listening to the lyrics on vinyl vs digital formatted and somewhat more connected to the “feeling” of the music. 

Damon Krukowski, speaks about this in his new book, "The New Analog:
Listening and reconnecting in the digital world.”

In a New Yorker article Krukowski describes, “The analog world of the sixties and early seventies, were this hypervisual culture.” At a lecture to UMaine journalism students, he describes today's world as a "hyperoral culture." The New Yorker article goes on Krukowski used concepts from “Ways of Seeing” a tv series on BBC in the seventies for his “Ways of Hearing" podcasts on Radiotopia. 



What does this mean for visual mediums such as fashion, photography and even art? Fashion institutions such as Vogue have embraced this form of media and the article from BIGIDAY entitled, “Inside Vogue’s New York Fashion Week digital wrap party,” described the shift in content from print to digital. 

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Good Times! Young Thug and a Posse of Models Show Off the Best of New York Fashion Week
The coolest party of New York Fashion Week was thrown by Young Thug, Cass Bird, and Jorden Bickham on the final day of the collections. Dress code? Some of our favorite looks for spring—from streetwea...


This content was accomplished by, “the editorial team designing the feature as digital-first, trading all still photos for full-screen looping video clips. As a result, the videos gave readers a peek into the photoshoot party, demonstrated how the designer clothing moves, and packed a range of poses and facial expressions into one overarching shot,” showing that analog can coexist in a digital world. 

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Maine Brain Drain

By Stacy Ellen 
Posted October 3, 2017

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America's Brain Drain
President Obama devoted much of his State of the Union address to education and science. For years our American universities have attracted the best science students in the world, but as John Blacksto...






It’s hard enough landing a good paying job in journalism, but rural parts of America like Maine could prove to be even more difficult. 

The "brain drain" phenomena could be part of the problem of retaining younger educated talent pools. John Martin tweets, “One of our shared issues between Maine & NH - brain associated w/a perceived lack of opportunity at home.”  Natalee E. Stotz commented on Twitter, “I felt the same @ their age. Now I’m back & getting some where professionally!” This is encouraging news for the Humanities and Religion teacher sector that Stotz states is her career on twitter. 








Eric G. E. Zuelow tweets, “Not sure about the numbers comparatively speaking, but  Maine is certainly aging. Brain drain a big problem.” 

So what is "brain drain,” by definition according to Merriam-Webster is, “the departure of educated or professional people from one country, economic sector, or field for another usually better pay or living conditions.”  

Portland seems to have the most quantity of journalism jobs in the state according to goggle search. But do the salaries compare to the cost of living? James Russell tweets of an infographic shows that seasonal employees in the Portland, Maine region is one factor in the pinching of housing supply. 














Why does Maine have a hard time retaining college educated younger work force has been posted in the news lately?  One reason could be the lack of diversified jobs and second the pay scale is low compared to the cost of living. Joes Rivano Barros tweets, "This is what happens when your  economic  powerhouse is tech & it denies minorities high-paying jobs.” Adam Côte who is running for governor of Maine tweets, "For better educational opportunities to more high paying jobs, we can make every corner of Maine Better." 














From a recent job search in Maine for graphic design positions, one that stated the pay rate was around $31,000-$35,000 with a bachelor’s degree and min of 3 years work experience. According to Indeed UMaine,  this salary equates to roughly $15-$17 dollars per hour. This is not even enough to afford a 2 bedroom apartment in Maine according to a Washington Post article. Not to mention having to pay off your college debt in the process of keeping a roof over your head. 



In an article posted on LinkedIn by Jeremy Francis, entitled “Why our kids won't succeed at Work,” states with college students being advised to go into careers in the DLE (Doctor, Lawyer and Engineering) Zone, “They have to compete with thousands of others for limited jobs, causing a brain drain and capacity building problem.” “The solution is to migrate.” 



















Instagram user Johan Van Logg posts a picture captioned, “Building an Empire with a turn of a  page #brain drain.”





  











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Wasteland or Recycle-land 

By Stacy Ellen 
Posted September 25, 2017
With the weather changing soon, a small set of UMaine students were asked what they did with their unwanted clothing. Almost all said they donated them to one charity or another. During a Mitchell Lecture on sustainability, Dr. Dietz, a professor of Sociology and Environmental Science and Policy from Michigan State University said, “We are reluctant to discuss value difference.” The students surveyed, answered with what they thought the politically correct answer should be. 

But upon more discussion on the issue, a few admitted they through away soiled or torn clothing. When asked why, they said because they were not good enough to donate, not knowing that they could recycle these textiles, much like plastic, paper and other materials. 

As mentioned in “The waste of changing seasons,” blog post, one solution on the UMaine campus is the Black Bear Exchange where you can exchange your clothing for some new wares of pick up some needed food. 

UMaine also has recycle bins around campus called zero-sort, unfortunately one of the only things not excepted are textiles. The Director of Sustainability at University of Maine, Dan Dixon said that,  “The contractor [Casella] does not allow textiles,” but that he would be interested in looking into the process involved in recycling textiles. 


Dixon went on to say, that Bangor and Orono used to have “Big Yellow Bins,”  possibly from Planet Aid for recycling clothing, but has not seen them lately. This company has been under investigation and according to an NBC Washington article, “Petersen [company owner] is now on the run -- wanted by Interpol -- after the Danish government charged him with charities fraud and tax evasion.” Perhaps this is why the bins are now gone. 

The university also has an end of year sale, the, “Clean Sweep Sale,” in which all of the items left “donated” by students are sold with the, “Proceeds will be used to support programs and services offered through UMaine’s Bodwell Center for Service and Volunteerism, including the Black Bear Exchange, Welcome Weekend Day of Service, and the MLK Day of Service meal-packing event.”

It looks like overall Maine students and the university itself are doing their fair share of recycling and donating instead of contributing to the 81 pounds per year that most people in the United States throw away. 

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