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Vending Machine to Recycling Bin
Sir Richard Branson speaks to College Students
Fashion vs. Clothing
Analog in a Digital World
Maine Brain Drain

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Vending Machine to Recycling Bin

Most people nowadays know how to navigate themselves to the correct recycling bin when finished with their beverage or snack from the vending machine. But what about when purchasing a tee shirt, socks or even flip flops, from such a  machine, where are the apparel recycling bins in the line up? 

The latest trend in fast fashion, a term coined because of the high volume of low prices clothing that comes in and out of store, in what seems like a blink of an eye, is the apparel vending machines.  Who What Wear, highlights some of the pioneers of this new way of selling with companies such as Uniqlo and Havanans cashing in on this trend. Followed by the extra money pocketed by,  “Cutting the middle man may be a savvy route to cost-cutting,” describes the Independent


Hopefully the consumers are also recycling these items instead of contributing to the 81 pounds of clothing many people in the United States throw away ever year. There are recycling bins for every product you can pretty much think up, sometimes all lined up together like little soldiers. But there has yet to be an apparel one amongst the rest. Those bins are usually outside second hand stores and scattered around random street corners. Why are they left alone all by themselves instead of being among the gang of recycle bins for glass, paper, plastic? 

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Sir Richard Branson speaks to College Students

Originally posted October 30, 2017

An inspiration speaker that is a master of customer experience and aesthetic. Sir Richard Branson speakers to college students around the United States through a speakers series sponsored by the National Society of Leadership and Success. 

The NSLS established it’s chapter at the University of Maine this Fall 2017 semester. This honor society is the largest in the United States and prides itself on "Building Leaders Who Make a Better World," 

Branson, is the owner of Virgin Group, a leading international investment group and one of the world's most recognized and respected brands which was conceived in 1970.

In the speaker broadcast Branson, talks about being, ”Someone that creates something that makes something positive for someone's lives.”  As a successful entrepreneur he has now been able to tackle problems of the world and give back to society. 
 
Some of his inspirational quotes from the speaker broadcast were: 
-"Achieve something that has never been achieved before"
-"Just get on and do it"
-"Start in a small way and get some traction" when having a idea that had not been done before. 
-"Keep the top company owned by you and your family" 
-“Making positive difference in people's lifes"  
-“Market your product if you have something interesting to talk about. Try to get in the paper, get the word out for free rather then paying for advertising.”
-And that he, “Learned tons from starting something outside of the walls of the academic society.”
-"Just do it, if you have a goal in life, just go for it."  "Bolder and braver and not take no for an answer" 
-“Find the gap in the market and something that frustrates you and do it yourself.”
-And the one that stuck out the most to me, "Make a difference in the world,” Sir Richard Branson 

No matter where you are in life, if you have money or not, there is alway something big or small that one can do to make the world a better place. 

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Fashion vs. Clothing

Originally posted October 22, 2017

First sight makes a lasting impression. Nonverbal communication makes up 93% of everyday communication, according to Albert Mehrabian. How people size up one another when first meeting, what one chooses as their outfit for the day tells the world who they are. According to the Changing Minds organization, "A simple rule is 'Dress to impress', which means what you should wear can vary greatly with your audience." 

Just think about it like walking around looking at yourself in the mirror all day. The mirror image is what the world sees of you and unfortunately human nature does judge a book by its cover. If this is the way of the world why not step out into it with your best [foot] outfit to show they world who you are? Take pride in your uniqueness and let you're clothing be your calling card to the world of how you want people to see you. 


The tee shirts people wear and what is printed on them tell a story about just like a billboard does. In a Complex Magazine article, Jon Moy breaks down tee shirts into 26 different categories. Moy describes category, “#20 athletictecht -  Personally, I don’t know you if you wear super technical T-shirts like this. Under Armour? What the fuck?” As well as category,  “#21 colleget You are a character in a romantic comedy who has reluctantly returned to their home town after years of living in New York City,” which I can truly relate to at this point in my life. 

Preserve History on a students tee shirt this morning tells me that he is interested in history from not even speaking to him. The fraternity someone's in the band that they like, where they've traveled and what their favorite sports team is. All of these tee shirt billboards tell a story about a person without even knowing them, so make sure you choose the correct one. 
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Analog in a Digital World

Originally posted October 10, 2017

Any form of media in today's digital world relies on the latest in technology. Does digital take away from the soul of this consumption? 

Take for example, listening to music on a record versus your iPhone. For me even if it is a contemporary album like Bruno Mars, I feel nostalgic by listening to the lyrics on vinyl vs digital formatted and somewhat more connected to the “feeling” of the music. 

Damon Krukowski, speaks about this in his new book, "The New Analog:
Listening and reconnecting in the digital world.”

In a New Yorker article Krukowski describes, “The analog world of the sixties and early seventies, were this hypervisual culture.” At a lecture to UMaine journalism students, he describes today's world as a "hyperoral culture." The New Yorker article goes on Krukowski used concepts from “Ways of Seeing” a tv series on BBC in the seventies for his “Ways of Hearing" podcasts on Radiotopia. 



What does this mean for visual mediums such as fashion, photography and even art? Fashion institutions such as Vogue have embraced this form of media and the article from BIGIDAY entitled, “Inside Vogue’s New York Fashion Week digital wrap party,” described the shift in content from print to digital. 
You need Flash Player in order to view this.
Good Times! Young Thug and a Posse of Models Show Off the Best of New York Fashion Week
The coolest party of New York Fashion Week was thrown by Young Thug, Cass Bird, and Jorden Bickham on the final day of the collections. Dress code? Some of our favorite looks for spring—from streetwea...




This content was accomplished by, “the editorial team designing the feature as digital-first, trading all still photos for full-screen looping video clips. As a result, the videos gave readers a peek into the photoshoot party, demonstrated how the designer clothing moves, and packed a range of poses and facial expressions into one overarching shot,” showing that analog can coexist in a digital world. 

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Maine Brain Drain

Originally posted October 3, 2017
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America's Brain Drain
President Obama devoted much of his State of the Union address to education and science. For years our American universities have attracted the best science students in the world, but as John Blacksto...





It’s hard enough landing a good paying job in journalism, but rural parts of America like Maine could prove to be even more difficult.

The "brain drain" phenomena could be part of the problem of retaining younger educated talent pools. John Martin tweets, “One of our shared issues between Maine & NH - brain associated w/a perceived lack of opportunity at home.”  Natalee E. Stotz commented on Twitter, “I felt the same @ their age. Now I’m back & getting some where professionally!” This is encouraging news for the Humanities and Religion teacher sector that Stotz states is her career on twitter. 







Eric G. E. Zuelow tweets, “Not sure about the numbers comparatively speaking, but  Maine is certainly aging. Brain drain a big problem.” 

So what is "brain drain,” by definition according to Merriam-Webster is, “the departure of educated or professional people from one country, economic sector, or field for another usually better pay or living conditions.”

Portland seems to have the most quantity of journalism jobs in the state according to goggle search. But do the salaries compare to the cost of living? James Russell tweets of an infographic shows that seasonal employees in the Portland, Maine region is one factor in the pinching of housing supply. 














Why does Maine have a hard time retaining college educated younger work force has been posted in the news lately?  One reason could be the lack of diversified jobs and second the pay scale is low compared to the cost of living. Joes Rivano Barros tweets, "This is what happens when your  economic  powerhouse is tech & it denies minorities high-paying jobs.” Adam Côte who is running for governor of Maine tweets, "For better educational opportunities to more high paying jobs, we can make every corner of Maine Better." 


From a recent job search in Maine for graphic design positions, one that stated the pay rate was around $31,000-$35,000 with a bachelor’s degree and min of 3 years work experience. According to Indeed UMaine,  this salary equates to roughly $15-$17 dollars per hour. This is not even enough to afford a 2 bedroom apartment in Maine according to a Washington Post article. Not to mention having to pay off your college debt in the process of keeping a roof over your head. 


In an article posted on LinkedIn by Jeremy Francis, entitled “Why our kids won't succeed at Work,” states with college students being advised to go into careers in the DLE (Doctor, Lawyer and Engineering) Zone, “They have to compete with thousands of others for limited jobs, causing a brain drain and capacity building problem.” “The solution is to migrate.” 

















Instagram user Johan Van Logg posts a picture captioned, “Building an Empire with a turn of a  page #brain drain.”




















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